Mytwipix's Blog

…get your twilight fix

Comic-Con: Watch, Listen or Read the BREAKING DAWN Press Conference with Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Taylor Lautner, Bill Condon and Comic-Con 2011: THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN – PART 1 Panel Recap

And finally here’s more Breaking Dawn coverage at comic con, found at

http://collider.com/kristen-stewart-robert-pattinson-interview-twilight-breaking-dawn/103975/

comic-con-twilight-breaking-dawn-slice-01

Earlier this morning, before taking the stage in Hall H at Comic-Con, Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Taylor Lautner and director Bill Condon sat down with a huge group of reporters and answered a ton of questions about The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn.  In the next hour or so we’ll have the full transcript and a proper intro, but for now, hit the jump to watch the entire press conference or listen to the audio.  They talked about the challenges of making the final two movies,  their favorite scenes, and a lot more.  In addition, I was in the front row, so the video is pretty good.  Hope you like.

[Update: We’ve added the full transcript after the jump.]

If you’d like to listen to the press conference, click here.  The audio might be better than the audio in the video.  It actually might be better to sync the two up.  I tried to in the edit, but ran into some tech problems.

And if you missed Matt’s recap of the Breaking Dawn panel in Hall H, click here. (I have it located at bottom of this article)

Christina Radish here. With Comic-Con in full swing, of course one of the big draws this year was the cast of The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Pt. 1. Fans got in line starting on Monday, for the Thursday morning appearance by the actors, in order to see highly anticipated footage from what marks the start of the final story in the vampire saga, and Summit kicked things off with a press conference prior to all the Hall H insanity.

During the interview, stars Kristen Stewart, Rob Pattinson and Taylor Lautner, along with director Bill Condon, talked about being loved all over the world, the level of secrecy involved in filming the wedding of Bella and Edward, how graphic and violent the birth scene seemed during filming, the difficulty for Taylor in figuring out how to imprint, how apprehensive Rob was about taking his shirt off, and Kristen’s embarrassment at her inability to pick up one of the kids playing Renesmee. The full transcript is below:

Question: How was it to film in Brazil?

CONDON: It was great. It was amazing. That’s where Stephenie [Meyer] wrote the honeymoon. She actually had been. We went in search of what she wrote, and I think we found it. It was very cool. We would take a trip to work everyday. That was great. We got stranded. That was not.

STEWART: It was nice being able to shoot on the actual streets and see the people. To see that, within the context of this movie is definitely jarring, in a great way.

What’s it like to be loved all over the world?

PATTINSON: It’s nice. It’s different. I don’t know if it’s love, necessarily. Shooting in Brazil, it’s interesting. One of the interesting things about having an international fanbase is that every single country has a different reaction to you and to the movie. Shooting on the street in Brazil – compared to people trying to sneak a picture of something, if you’re shooting in the States or Canada – people would literally just try to grab you. It was pretty fun. It would happen on the set, in the shot.

LAUTNER: I was not there. I do love Brazil, but I was not there. But, they came back and showed me this pictured. They told me first that there was an extra that looked just like me. They showed me this picture and I even thought it was me. It was the weirdest thing. They had to place him further back, in case the camera accidentally went over him.

STEWART: He was acting like Taylor, too. He looked like an Eclipse poster.

CONDON: Totally rewriting the story, they go on their honeymoon, and there is Jacob.

LAUTNER: That would have been so hilarious, if the camera was going over while Edward and Bella were walking through, and Jacob was just standing there, watching them.

Do you think the Breaking Dawn movies will truly be the end of the Twilight Saga?

PATTINSON: Yeah, they’ll have Breakfast Time, or something. There’s TwilightEclipseBreaking Dawn and then Brunch. I don’t know. It’s up to Stephenie [Meyer], really.

LAUTNER: I second that.

CONDON: Stephenie already said it’s the end of the Bella/Edward story. But, especially in the second movie, there are so many new characters, I’m not sure, but I suspect she’ll want to revisit them, at some point.

PATTINSON: You sound like you have some secret knowledge.

Out of all of the Twilight films, what was the most secretive scene that you had to film?

STEWART: The wedding, definitely. It was like Secret Service style insane. The crew was completely inconvenienced, grumbling around the set like, “I can’t have my cell phone!”

LAUTNER: They were like, “No cell phone! No email!”

STEWART: It was like, “You don’t understand what this means to us! Thank you so much! If this dress gets on the Internet, I’ll die!” But, that really was crazy.

CONDON: And then, there was a helicopter right as you were ready to take your vows.

STEWART: I had a Volturi cloak on because that’s all that we had to cover up. It was really funny.

What was the scene that you felt was the most exposed to fans?

PATTINSON: We didn’t have to do anything that was too intimate, where there were a lot of people around. Or, we didn’t know there were a lot of people around.

STEWART: We didn’t know when we were being photographed. That was always a weird experience, after the fact. It was like, “Oh, that whole scene! Awesome!”

LAUTNER: A lot of the movie takes places inside, so most of our time was spent in Baton Rouge, filming on a stage, and then we had two months in Vancouver. Breaking Dawn is very intimate. And, I feel like they did a really good job at allowing us to be creative and just be with each other. We didn’t have to focus on being distracted, or anything like that, on this movie.

STEWART: They protected us.

Kristen, Breaking Dawn is such an emotional journey for Bella, with the wedding, honeymoon and being pregnant. What was it like filming all of that for months, and how did all of that affect you, personally?

STEWART: I can’t draw a line between myself and stuff that I do. It’s funny, I don’t want to sound like it’s just about this, but really with everything I do, it’s hard for me to take myself out of it. I’d been building up to this for four years. I was 17 when I started doing these movies. This really is loaded with those really cathartic, impactful, huge life moments, and they’re not all completely fantasy. They’re really very rooted in a reality that I can completely see myself in, and anyone who reads the book could imagine. Shooting the scenes, I had to realize that these moments will find themselves naturally. I can’t let the book punch me in the face every morning to wake me up. You have to let the moments happen, and they did. I just went for it. I do feel like it’s very, very close to the book, and a really sincere telling of the story, but at the same time, there are bits that are surprises, that surprised me too, in the more iconic bits, like the wedding and on the honeymoon.

CONDON: The thing that amazed me is that there’s no bigger fan of Twilight than Kristen. She’s approached it as an actress, but she’s also like, “I know what it felt like, when I was reading this the first time.” She was always pushing to make sure she was capturing that feeling. She did put that pressure on herself.

STEWART: That feels like such a self-conscious answer, but yeah.

Bill, do you feel like there’s a theme running through your films of societal repression and people not being allowed to be themselves?

bill_condon_image_01CONDON: It would sound really pretentious to say that, but I do feel like I am drawn to people who are outsiders that are yearning, and all these characters are. Jacob is yearning, all the time. Edward and Bella are trying to find a way to live the life that they were meant to.

Do you guys have a favorite scene in these last two films?

CONDON: I have a lot of them.

LAUTNER: I’ve always been able to choose one, for all the movies, but I’m about ready to let you down. I’m so sorry. I’ve always been able to choose one, for every single movie, but this one, I can’t! I don’t know. There’s so much going on is this move, and all of the characters are dealing with their own little things. It’s impossible for me to choose my favorite scene in this movie. Jacob changes so much, from the beginning to the end, so it’s hard for me to choose. I don’t know. It’s weird.

STEWART: There’s a scene with Bella and Charlie at the wedding, that I love so much. And also, there’s one with Renee as well. There’s one after the other and I really liked them.

PATTINSON: The birth scene is so different to everything else in the movie. For a fantasy series that has a young-ish audience, I find it interesting. It goes quite far. It’s quite hard core. It’s quite graphic. It was when we were doing it, anyway.

STEWART: It felt overtly graphic.

PATTINSON: But, there’s no other way to do it. If you read the book, there’s no way to do it in any kind of tamed way. It was fun. It felt like it was brave.

Bill, when you were announced for this project, one of the points that you made was that you were a big fan of Dark Shadows. What was the appeal of that for you, and what are you feeling about these genres, in general?

CONDON: I don’t know. I was a kid and I would run home to see that show. There were all kinds of creatures, but it was mostly vampires and Barnabas Collins. I think it was growing up in a very intense Catholic household that makes you a little twisted. Whatever new vampires are around, I’ve always been interested in them, as I was with Twilight.

Do you guys ever wish that this was a small independent film that ran on the Sundance Channel? Your lives would be very different. How do you tune out the enormous distractions and just do the work?

STEWART: If this was a tiny little independent movie that only ran on Sundance, then we would not be able to do the movie justice. Maybe the first few, but this one is really a big movie. It’s nice to be indulgent. It’s nice to shoot for six months with an A-lister (Bill Condon). We wouldn’t be sitting here doing a press conference about it. We’d be sitting in some cool little, snowy, lofty place in Sundance.

Comic-Con is all about embracing your inner nerd. What are some of the nerdy or geeky things that you’ve learned about each other?

STEWART: I think I’m always cool.

PATTINSON: I don’t think Kristen would say it’s nerdy, but she literally only watches the cooking channel, especially on set. It’s bizarre. She has a TV in the make-up trailer, which is always on. It’s her only diva-ish behavior, having the cooking channel on, at all times, in every room.

STEWART: And, you all reap the benefits.

LAUTNER: It’s true.

STEWART: Taylor can dance, and he never wants to say that he can.

LAUTNER: No, that’s so not true!

STEWART: He can move his hips better than I will ever dream. It’s crazy! He can move!

PATTINSON: That’s not nerdy. That’s awesome!

STEWART: You should see how he does it. It’s always to the craziest music.

LAUTNER: You’re right. I’ll give you that one. In the hair and make-up trailer. It’s where things happen.

Besides the wedding scene, what scene were you most nervous or apprehensive about shooting, knowing that you really had to pull it off?

LAUTNER: I was pretty nervous about imprinting. I was given an X on a wall, and I had to walk into the room, on the verge of killing this baby, and then stop, twist and imprint on it, whatever that means.

PATTINSON: That sounds amazing! That’s Jacob’s signature move.

LAUTNER: That was challenging. I spent a lot of time talking to Bill [Condon] and to Stephenie [Meyer] and asking, “Okay guys, what exactly does imprinting even look like?” It was tough, so I sure hope it comes across all right.

CONDON: He did beautifully.

PATTINSON: Embarrassingly, the thing I was most nervous about was taking my shirt off.

STEWART: At least he’s honest. That’s cool.

PATTINSON: So much of the books are about Edward’s body, and I’ve managed to avoid having my shirt off, the whole series. In the book, it’s almost every three pages. I was like, “I don’t think I can wear a t-shirt when I’m in the sea, or a onesie.” I look like an inflatable frankfurter in the sea.

What was the most awkward scene you had to shoot?

STEWART: I couldn’t pick up the kid sometimes. We have Mackenzie Foy, who is an amazing little kid. She’s the coolest kid ever, and smarter than me, in a lot of ways. Then, we had these other little girls, who would come in to play the younger version of Renesmee, and they’re all very awesome little kids, but not having them there every day, I was awkward and I can’t handle that. Me and McKenzie were awesome, but I just couldn’t really deal with that. I looked ridiculous. They were bigger than me, in some cases. I should have put the kid on my head, or something. That was just not a good day.

CONDON: This girl had to run toward Billy Burke, but instead kept running into a wall. So, I was like, “No, you’ve got to carry her,” and she said, “Okay, I’ll do it,” and then, she peed on you.

STEWART: I was holding her and she just peed, and that’s fine. She was so nervous.

PATTINSON: Talking about the baby, we had an animatronic baby for one bit. It was Kristen’s scene, where Bella had to be introduced to the baby, for the first time.

STEWART: In the book, that was one of my favorite parts. And then, to know that you’re not going to be looking at a real child was weird.

PATTINSON: It was Chucky from Child’s Play.

STEWART: And the guy was sweating right below my eyeline. They’d get the hand up to touch your face, and then it sticks to your hair and pulls a little bit, and you’re like, “Ah, get that thing off me. Get me a baby! This is ridiculous! And, it had hair and it’s a newborn baby. I know that that’s in the book and you can imagine how cool that would be.

PATTINSON: It looked like the trolls that you put on the at the end of your pencil.

CONDON: It was the weirdest thing, looking at the dailies. I would call cut and the baby’s eyes were still moving.

PATTINSON: It was Chucky Renesmee.

How do you guys deal with the middle-aged women who love you? Does it creep you out?

PATTINSON: I’m not creeped out at all by it. I guess to be creeped out by it, you’d have to be creeped out by middle-aged women in general, which I’m not. Different strokes for different folks, I guess.

LAUTNER: But, no complaints here.

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN Part 1 poster

 

Comic-Con 2011: THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN – PART 1 Panel

Recap

Found at: http://collider.com/twilight-breaking-dawn-comic-con/100282/

I’m not a Twilight fan and I think I’ve made that as clear as humanly possible to the readers of the site.  But in Hall H this morning, I’m in the minority.  Fans have been lined up for days to get their first look at The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1.  We were shown two scenes from thefilm and stars Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, and Taylor Lautner talked about the controversial birth scene, the journey of their characters, and adorable children ask adorable questions.

Hit the jump for my report on the Comic-Con panel for The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1.  The film opens November 18th.

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN Part 1 posterThey kick off with some footage but before that happens, director Bill Condon walks on stage.  No one here knows who he is and they damn well should.  He tells the audience that this is the third act of the story and that Breaking Dawn – Part 1turns into a horror movie in the second half.  Then Stewart, Pattinson, and Lautner come on stage and the crowd damn sure well knows who they are.  The shrieks are unsurprisingly ear-splitting because they’re so damn handsome.

First question from moderator Eric Moro: What was it like to shoot the wedding?  The wedding comes at the end of the film and Stewart says she was most excited to shoot that scene.  There was also “crazy, secret service security” as she got into her dress.  She jokes at how lame it sounds to call the wedding scene, “her day”.

Pattinson talks about shooting the honeymoon scenes in Brazil and Pattinson says it’s beautiful.  Clearly, he has never seen City of God.  Pattinson jokes that the torrential downpour had them playing board games inside rather than “making passionate love on the beach.”

We’re about to see the first of two big scenes from the movie.  The first scene is where Jacob has joined up with the Cullens to be protected from the werewolves.  He talks with Carlisle and Esmee about getting Bella more blood but it’s clearly an uneasy alliance.  He then goes to confront Sam and his old wolf pack to tell them to back off, and that when the “problem” comes along (presumably Bella’s child), he’ll kill it.

After the clip, Lautner comments that Jacob really matures in this film.  I know Twilight fans want me to be neutral or positive on what I saw, but his lack of acting ability just makes what should feel like a serious scene come off as comical.

The next scene takes place on the first night of Bella and Edward’s honeymoon.  It’s worth noting that Edward doesn’t look anywhere near as pale as he does in previous films.  In the earlier films he looked like an albino and here he’s just slightly pale and also kind of sweaty.  When the scene opens, Bella and Edward look over their dope honeymoon sweet and then they enter the bedroom and anxiously look over the bed.  Edward then suggests they go for a swim in the ocean.  Bella says she’ll be there in a moment and then the tone almost becomes a romantic comedy.  Poppy music starts playing as she brushes her teeth, shaves her legs, and tries to pick the right sexy underwear.  She then tells herself “Don’t be a coward.”  Then, draped in a towel, she goes out to the beach and sees Edward in the distanced swimming.  She then drops the towel and from the waste up we can see her walk towards the water with shirtless Edward in the distance.  It felt a little cruel that you have a shirtless Robert Pattinson in a scene and you don’t show this crowd a close-up.

During the Q&A, both Stewart and Pattinson talk about the controversial birth scene.  They describe it as something unlike any other birthing scene ever, that there’s a sense of danger that pervades it, and that while Bella is ravenous for more blood and it feels like “there’s running through her veins,” Edward feels helpless and being “totally annihilated by the situation.”

Lautner also says the birth scene is his favorite in the movie and he credits Condon will the way it turned out.  It’s an intense scene but the actors have to all talk around it.  Even my interest is piqued although it’s more in a perverse way than genuine excitement.

Condon says that they have about 15 songs planned for the film, but they can’t say which because the deals haven’t been finalized.

Lautner says that Pattinson gives him a nice punch after Edward finds out that Jacob has “imprinted” on Edward’s newborn daughter, Renesmee (a werewolf falls in love with a baby).  Lautner also commented on how this is the first film that also puts the story at Jacob’s POV as well as Bella’s.  Stewart adds that because Bella withdraws from the other characters, the film is smart to move away from her and to Jacob.  After New Moon, I certainly wouldn’t mind less of crazy Bella.

Then supporting cast members Julia Jones, Elisabeth Reese, Nikki Reed, and Ashley Greene join the panel.  Moro asks them about their characters and how they develop in the film because it’s clear that the audience only has questions for Stewart, Pattinson, and Lautner.

As always, adorable children are adorable (the winner is a kid who asks Pattinson, “What was it like to have the baby with Bella?”), people ask what it’s like working with other hot actors,

Condon talks about shooting during the Rio Film Festival and the great Brazilian crew that worked with them for six weeks.  As for horror, Condon talks about being influenced by Hitchcock and that it’s pure cinema creating such a feeling of tension.  It’s also not the birth scene that is intense, but also the wolf attack and everything that happens in the last 30 minutes.  He also talks about trying to remain faithful to the books and knowing the material inside and out despite the “intensity” (which seems like the kind way to refer the most controversial book in the series) of the source material.

Click here for all our Comic-Con 2011 coverage.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: